Where is your data? Who’s accessing it? You may know if you have an identity access management solution, but what happens when that data leaves your control. What do you do then?

Check out this post for the basis for our conversation on this week’s episode which features me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series, co-host Allan Alford (@allanalfordintx), and our sponsored guest is Elliot Lewis (@elliotdlewis), CEO, Keyavi Data.

Thanks to this week’s podcast sponsor, Keyavi Data

Our Keyavi breaks new ground by making data itself intelligent and self-aware, so that it stays under its owner’s control and protects itself immediately, no matter where it is or who is attempting access. Keyavi is led by a team of renowned data security, encryption, and cyber forensics experts. See for yourself at keyavidata.com.

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On this episode of Defense in Depth, you’ll learn:

  • In general, all of security is based on detecting threats and stopping threats. When those two fail, and they do, what’s your recourse to protect your data?
  • What if when your data leaves your control either accidentally or through a malicious breach, you were still able to see your data wherever it went and your data could communicate back to you its status, allowing you to control access to your data?
  • There are so many scenarios when data leaves you, it’s impossible to protect for all scenarios.
  • Asset inventory is first step in the CIS 20. Just trying to get an asset inventory of equipment is difficult. An inventory of data is near impossible especially when you may be pumping out a terabyte of data a day.
  • Ideal situation is to protect data proactively, as it’s being created.
  • The ultimate goal is to have visibility of your data in perpetuity, for the life of the data, and you can decide when to destroy it even when it’s no longer within the confines of your greater network and ecosystem.
  • Governing your network, your applications, the rules, and the data is half the battle.
  • Data visibility also allows you to make informed decisions as a business and can provide the answers your legal team will need in case there’s a breach.
  • You want the data protection and visibility schema to be platform and ecosystem independent. If data is taken out of the ecosystem, then the protection and visibility is moot.
  • A good precursor to this is digital rights management or DRM. They have figured out how to manage data from being copied and manipulated and they can place controls on it. The limiting factor though is it’s platform dependent.