When do we hit the diminishing returns of too much cybersecurity? How will we know? Will a bell go off? Will our cup runneth over?



This week’s episode is hosted by me, David Spark (@dspark), producer of CISO Series and founder of Spark Media Solutions and Mike Johnson. Our guest is Tony Sager, svp, chief evangelist, Center for Internet Security.

Thanks to this week’s podcast sponsor, AppOmni

AppOmni is the leading provider of SaaS security and management platform for the enterprise. AppOmni provides unprecedented data access visibility, management and security of SaaS, enabling organizations to secure mission-critical and sensitive data. With AppOmni, organizations can automatically and continuously enforce rules for data access, data sharing and third-party applications.

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On this week’s episode

Looking down the security roadmap

Dean Webb of ForeScout asked this great question on Peerlyst. “What are the things that are the hardest to fix that leave organizations the most vulnerable?” These are not the quick security fixes or low hanging fruit, but rather the big projects that nobody wants that often never get finished. What are they and is there any way to make them not so painful?

It’s time for “Ask a CISO”

sitdownson on reddit’s AskNetSec asked, “How and when did you decide to specialize?” Sultan_of_Ping answered, “For most people it’s not a decision, the specialization comes to them.” Do you get a taste of everything and then determine which one you’re passionate about? Do you read market demands (e.g. cloud security) and go in that route? What have you seen your colleagues do?

What’s Worse?!

A “What’s Worse?!” first – FOUR scenarios. Which one is worst?

Here’s some surprising research

We’re revisiting the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. Tony’s organization, Center for Internet Security had a hand in the report and specifically at the end where you map the CIS top 20 to the breach findings. In particular, the report notes that there are 171 safeguards that are grouped based on the resources and risks the organizations are facing. Has anything shifted significantly in this most recent report?

What’s the return on investment?

Tip of the hat to Norman Hunt, Deputy CISO, GEICO, who sent this article from HelpNet Security about a study on CEOs and CISOs approaches to “When is security enough security?” There seems to be a disparity with CEOs being more confident with the security that CISOs. I have to assume that mature understanding of risk is the biggest contributor, and the nature of the job of a CISO who sees more threats than the CEO, but only in a cyber context. A CEO sees all the other risks. What causes such swings in opinions?